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Topics

Topics

Cyberspace and its underlying infrastructure are vulnerable to a wide range of risk stemming from both physical and cyber threats and hazards. Sophisticated cyber actors and nation-states exploit vulnerabilities to steal information and money and are developing capabilities to disrupt, destroy, or threaten the delivery of essential services. A range of traditional crimes are now being perpetrated through cyberspace. This includes the production and distribution of child pornography and child exploitation conspiracies, banking and financial fraud, intellectual property violations, and other crimes, all of which have substantial human and economic consequences.
A very real, clear and present danger lurks just beyond the consciousness of people who work together eight to ten hours a day, five to seven days a week. It is the potential for violence to occur in your workplace. Increasingly, the Human Resources function is both the target of these threats of workplace violence and the organization's first line of defense for the prevention of workplace violence. What causes workplace violence? Are violent actions more likely to occur at work? What actions or changes tell an organization that an individual has the potential to commit a violent act at work?
Active shooter incidents in the United States continue to rise in frequency, with new FBI statistics showing the highest average of incidents occurred in the past two-year period.
Effective risk management strategies allow you to identify your project’s strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. By planning for unexpected events, you can be ready to respond if they arise.
Business continuity is a proactive plan to avoid and mitigate risks associated with a disruption of operations. It details steps to be taken before, during and after an event to maintain the financial viability of an organization.
Regardless of industry, when an unforeseen event takes place and brings day-to-day operations to a halt, an organization needs to recover as quickly as possible and continue to provide services to its clients. From data security breaches to natural disasters, there must be a plan in place in case of a catastrophe. Not having a disaster recovery plan in place can put the organization at risk of high financial costs, reputation loss and even greater risks for its clients and customers.
A hurricane dumped record rainfall on Texas, another left nearly all of Puerto Rico without electricity and intense wildfires killed more than 40 people in California — all in just two months in 2017 So far in 2017, 15 separate weather and climate disasters have each caused at least $1 billion in damages in the U.S., according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Initial estimates from AccuWeather put the damage from the northern California wildfires at well over $1 billion. If so, 2017 would tie 2011 for the most billion-dollar disasters, according to NOAA.
A crisis communications plan is an important component of any disaster plan. It can act as a guide to help you quickly contain the crisis and recover from its impact. Whether it’s a weather disaster, a highly publicized lawsuit or a bad product review, your reaction should be immediate, focused and emphatic.
People get fired for saying stupid things on social media all the time. And while you can't fire a corporation, they also seem to make some serious social media blunders.